About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
next former speaker of the house newt gingrich presents the second book in the historical fiction serious "victory at yorktown." it's a little over an hour. good etching. i have the honor of being the executive director of the ronald reagan presidential center. it's a pleasure to welcome you here on the rainy evening. in honor the men and women in uniform who defend our freedom around the world within if you would stand and join me for the pledge of allegiance. i plek allegiance to the flag of united states of america. and to the republican for which it stands, one nation under god, and with lib if i and justice for all. thank you. please be seated. before we get started ilgd like to recognize a few special guests we have with us. i would like to begin with a welcome to one of our members of board of trustees and the former governor of the state of california pete wilson. governor. [applause] [applause] our county supervisor peter floyd. peter, thank you for coming. [applause] now for those of who who were patient enough to go through the book signing line prior to the event this
the roots of that? >> i think i can. i arrived here in 1979. one of my classmates was newt gingrich. early on, he took on as his target, the speaker jim wright. that was the beginning of some of this polarization. there is little dout th -- and doubt that in the days of to ill, it was tip o'ne a better time. since those last couple of decades, the institution has suffered from too much partisanship. >> before mr. gingrich, i would imagine he would argue the republican house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. in turn, it is significant for the american public to know that appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to you
gingrich and we got out from under some difficult financial problems but i do believe and i still believe there was some illegal activities that took place and we were unable to get the job done. i've always said that janet reno was the greatest blocker than anybody i had ever seen in the national football league. one thing i've learned was if you're the president and you want to protect your legacy and office you want to make sure you have an attorney general that will protect your back and janet reno, god bless her, she did that very effectively. i sent five criminals i thought were ironclad and she never moved on any of them. the clinton administration did a lot of good things. i also think there were things that were done wrong. that should have been pursued and that is why we pursued them so diligently. i was criticized roundly, they made fun of a lot of things we did. that goes with the territory. >> when you want to explain to people about the investigation's power of congress, how do you explain that role of congress? >> the congress has the responsibility to ferret waste, and abu
there was that moment -- newt gingrich and robert dole are all saying yes, this was a great president. i think now, too, we're looking at ronald reagan, those of us who are democrats or liberal, and able to look back at him and say the same thing. so somewhere in the middle come an awareness of what makes a strong president. >> and the first person who unld that was ronald reagan. we talked about a rendezvous with destiny, a time for choosing, his speech in 1964 that launched his national career, was rife with fdr phraseology. >> from his acceptance speech. yeah. and he was for him originally. >> absolutely. >> let's go to john meacham, who's going to select four presidents that he's written about. brought to you by his -- >> i am -- no, no, no. i'm for good hair presidents. >> oh, good. >> andrew jackson. >> big hair. >> i believe -- my test was existential crises. i think andrew jackson was president at a time when popular democracy could have gone one way or the other and also really good hair. i think president -- fdr is a natural, not such good hair. but i also think that john kennedy, when you sa
that president clinton did not do some good things. he worked with newt gingrich and we got out from under some difficult financial problems but i do believe and i still believe there was some illegal activities that took place and we were unable to get the job done. i've always said that janet reno was the greatest blocker than anybody i had ever seen in the national football league. one thing i've learned was if you're the president and you want to protect your legacy and office you want to make sure you have an attorney general that will protect your back and janet reno, god bless her, she did that very effectively. i sent five criminals i thought were ironclad and she never moved on any of them. so i think the clinton administration did a lot of good things. i also think there were things that were done wrong. that should have been pursued and that is why we pursued them so diligently. i was criticized roundly, they made fun of a lot of things we did. that goes with the territory. >> when you want to explain to people about the investigation's power of congress, how do you explain that role
ago, he confronted partisan gridlock. newt gingrich and bill clinton got together to reach an agreement it was very controversial. newt gingrich said -- this is october 20, 1998. "i will say to each and every member of this house, unless they have a plan they think can get 218 votes over here, can pass through a filibuster in the senate, and get signed, there is no responsible vote except yes." america expects its congress to get to yes. we are prepared to work with the speaker and with the republican leadership. we all need to be willing to work with the president of united states to get to yes, for our country and for our constituents. now, and want to yield to my very dear friend, the assistant leader of the democratic caucus, my friend jim clyburn, from south carolina. >> think you very much, representative hoyer. last year, when the tea party republicans stymied the efforts of the deficit reduction committee that we called "the supercommittee," we said at the time that it would take a definitive election to decide the matter. november 6, the american people spoke. the
classmates was newt gingrich. early on, he took on as his target, the speaker jim wright. that was the beginning of some of this polarization. it was a better time. -- there is little doubt that in the days of tip o'neill, but it was a better time. since those last couple of decades, the institution has suffered from too much partisanship. >> before mr. gingrich, i would imagine he would argue the republican house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to yo
people. when he put so much money into the new gingrich effort and then into the matter on the effort -- -- into the mitt romney effort and he did not win in either case and he was not alone. there were other people. both sides spent more than $1 billion. can you imagine? we are in the middle of a fiscal crisis and on the political campaign, this or reaffirmed the status quo with republicans in charge of the house and democrats in charge of the senate and obama as president -- we spent $2 billion? really? did we simply boost local television advertising rates? i don't know but it is a good question. what does all this money by you? host: a story i saw a said he would do it again. he insinuated that he was inclined to do it again. guest: i guess he will double down. he is a guy who wants a return on his dollar and is trying to influence things. his big interests seems to be u.s. relations with israel. do i think he shifted or help to ed. i don't think he helped. host: independent line, go ahead caller: good morning. this is just to you, juan. i have seen you put yourself on the line a
together the way ronald reagan and tip o'neill did, the way clinton did with bob dole, and newt gingrich. there is a long history of this. it means people getting into a room and preventing what we all want to prevent, and if we share the same goal, there should be a way for us to reach it. i am sorry that the house yesterday was unable to pass that the resolution, which was obviously a rebuke to their leader, but hopefully over their recess, when the come back after christmas, there will be cooler heads prevail in, and the president will begin serious negotiations. thanks. >> he looked at the house and senate reaction to the attack on the u.s. consulate. you also look at the accountability review board on how the state department handled the matter. today's at 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> the issues, a different times the government can punish them as a result of the moral condemnation. the answer is once. >> c-span radio is featuring supreme court oral arguments before they were on the bench. all this week at 7:00 p.m. eastern. it to watch this in the baltimore area. >> on wed. pres
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)